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PASS FOR THE VATICAN AND ROME – MUSEUMS, ATTRACTIONS, FREE TRANSPORT

If you are going to visit Rome in 3 days, but you do not want to turn your holiday into a marathon, a good solution is to use the Omnia Vatican & Rome, a cultural tourist card that will allow you to discover the treasures of Vatican City and the major attractions of Rome and to avoid the queues, by taking advantage of discounts and unlimited public transport.
With this combined pass, valid for 3 days (72 hours), you can in fact:

  • Skip the queue and get free access to the Vatican Museums, St. Peter’s Basilica and the Colosseum
  • Skip the queue of the Sistine Chapel
  • Take advantage of the special discounts OMNIA Vatican Pass and Roma Pass
  • Discover the eternal city with hop-on hop-on bus tours, by stopping where and when you want
  • Use public transport in unlimited ways
  • Access with discounted prices the best museums in Rome
  • Never lose your orientation thanks to the free pocket guide of Rome and the Vatican

    Notes: The entrance to the Colosseum is free every first Sunday of the month, so in these days it will not be possible to take advantage of the priority entrance.
    The Roma Pass is not available for groups. Groups of more than 9 people may not be eligible for attractions.

MEETING POINT WHERE TO EXCHANGE THE VOUCHER

Office of the Opera Romana Pellegrinaggi, Piazza Pio XII 9 – 00193, Rome.
Opening times: Monday to Friday: 9.00am – 6.00pm Saturday and Sunday: 9.00am – 4.00pm, closed on August 15th November 1st, December 8th, December 25th and December 26th.

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?

From 108 euros

DETAILS

The Omnia Vatican Card includes

Fast-track entry to the Vatican Museums and the Sistine Chapel
Entrance to the Basilica of San Giovanni in Laterano and the cloister with a multimedia audioguide
Fast line entrance to St. Peter’s Basilica
Interactive tour of the San Pietro prison with a multimedia audioguide

The Roma card includes also free entry to 2 of the following attractions

Galleria Borhese
Capitolini Museums
Castel Sant’Angelo
Colosseum
The Palatino e the Roman Forum

The Pass also includes discounts for numerous museums and attractions

Museums

National Museum of Castel Sant’Angelo
National Roman Museum – Palazzo Massimo alle Terme
National Roman Museum – Palazzo Altemps
National Roman Museum – Crypta Balbi
National Roman Museum – Baths of Diocletian
National Gallery of Palazzo Barberini
Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia
Capitoline Museums
Centrale Montemartini
National Museum of Oriental Art
MACRO – Museum of Contemporary Art Rome
MAXXI – National Museum of XXI Century Arts
Planetarium and astronomical museum

Attractions

Appia Antica
Trajan’s Market
Palazzo Valentini
Ara Pacis

Tour Roma Cristiana (Christian Rome) by bus with a panoramic plan. The stops include

Basilica of Saint Peter
Piazza Navona
Pantheon
Santa Maria in Aracoeli
Central stations – Termini
Santa Maria Maggiore
San Giovanni – Scala Santa
Colosseum – Roman Forum
Circus Maximus
Tiber Island
Palazzo Farnese

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THE TEN ATTRACTIONS AND MONUMENTS TO VISIT IN ROME IN A WEEK

Visiting Rome in a week will be an unforgettable experience for you. You will have time to enjoy what the eternal city has to offer to its visitors.
We suggest you the main attractions and monuments that you absolutely should not miss. They are all super-searched attractions, so we suggest you to get an online ticket before you start your visit, in order to avoid the queue and to save save time and energy for the visit!

Below are listed the 10 attractions and the main monuments to visit in Rome in a week:

 Rome in a week: don't miss the Colosseum
Colosseum

Symbol par excellence of Rome and of Italy itself, Colosseum 罗马竞技场 is the most visited attraction in the city, with almost five million visitors a year.
Started by Vespasiano in 72 d.c., was inaugurated by his son Titus in 80 a.d. It could host more than 50,000 spectators who came here to watch gladiatorial or animal fights. It is the largest of the Roman monuments left until today.

The queues at the entrance are very long. We therefore advise you to buy the ticket online for priority access.

The amazing Basilica of San Pietro in RomeBasilica of Saint Peter

It is located where the emperor Constantine had a shrine erected in the year 324 in honor of Peter the Apostle, who had been crucified and buried right there.
Today’s look is due to the project of Bramante, dating back to 1506. It was built by artists such as Raphael, Antonio da San Gallo, Michelangelo. The interior, as well as the colonnade were made by Bernini. The basilica is the largest church in the world. If you want to climb on its amazing dome we suggest you get the ticket online: you will be able to skip the line!

Opening times: 1st October – 31 March every day 7.00-18.30 / 1st April – 30

 The Laocoonte group at the Vatican Museums. Buy the tickets online to skip the line
The Vatican Museums

Among the most beautiful museum complexes in the world, they host an incredible collection of works of art collected by different popes over the centuries. To visit them it is possible to make different itineraries, all of which end with the Sistine Chapel. The buildings that house the Vatican Museums extend over an area of 5.5 hectares. The Pinacoteca, the Pio-Clementino Museum, the Geographical Maps Gallery, the Raffello Rooms and the Sistine Chapel are absolutely worth seeing. There are very long queues at the entrance. If you want to save time and effort, you should purchase an online ticket.

Opening times: Monday to Saturday 9.00-18.00 (last admission at 4pm and exit from the rooms half an hour before closing). Full ticket € 16, reduced ticket € 8.

The Pantheon, one of the attractions to visit during the week in Roma
Pantheon

A temple dedicated to all the gods, this building, which is one the best preserved buildings of ancient Rome, was transformed into a Christian church in 608. The Pantheon was built by Agrippa in 27 b.c., as attested by the inscription on the pediment.
Both its height and the diameter of the interior measure 43.3 meters. The extraordinary dome, which is the largest stone vault ever built, is considered the most important work of classical architecture. Together with the Colosseum, the Pantheon is one of the great symbols of Rome and the best preserved ancient monument of the capital.

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The Trevi fountain, an attraction of Rome not to be missed
Trevi Fountain

Among the most photographed monuments in Rome, along with the Colosseum, it is one of the symbols of Rome in the world. This splendid baroque fountain, designed by Nicola Savi in 1732, occupies almost completely the small square in which it is located. It represents the waggon of Neptune pulled by tritons with sea horses (a wild one and a docile one) that symbolize the different aspects of the sea.

azza Navona, not to be missed during your weekly visit of Rome
Piazza Navona

Piazza Navona is the window of the center of Rome with its sculptured fountains, the beautiful Baroque palaces and the outdoor cafes. The square is always crowded with tourists, street artists, street vendors. Piazza Navona has been the seat of the main market of the city for 300 years. In this square you can compare the works of two great artists of the Baroque: the fountain of the four rivers by Bernini and the Church of Sant’Agnese in Agone built by Borromini.

Piazza di Spagna, one of the most famous squares of Rome
Piazza di Spagna

This 1725 Baroque square, with its famous Trinità dei Monti staircase (recently restored), has always attracted tourists and travelers and is still today a popular meeting place. The fountain in the shape of a boat (the Barcaccia) located in the square, is the work of Pietro Bernini, father of the famous Gian Lorenzo, and represents a sinking boat. It is one of the main places of the nightlife in the historic center of Rome.

The Borghese Gallery in Rome
Museo Galleria Borghese

Located in the park of Villa Borgese, a green lung of Rome, it hosts one of the most prestigious collections of art objects in Rome. In one place you will find a concentration of works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Botticelli and Raphael, and the famous statue of Canova portraying Paolina Borghese as the winning Venus. We recommend you to buy an online ticket for priority access.

Opening times: closed on Monday, Tuesday to Sunday from 8.30 to 19.30 closed on January 1, December 25. The entry is allowed up to half an hour before the closing time.
Full ticket €11,00(9,00 + 2,00 of mandatory booking), reduced ticket €6,50 (4,50 + 2,00 of mandatory booking). The cost of the entrance ticket could be increased.

The Vittoriano, one of the main monuments of Rome
Piazza Venezia

Connected to the Colosseum through the monumental Via dei Fori Imperiali is perhaps the most important crossroad of the city. On its sides there are Palazzo Venezia, the first large Renaissance building in Rome and the Vittoriano, a monument built since in 1885 to celebrate the unity of Italy. Inaugurated in 1911 it was then dedicated to the unknown soldier.
Online tickets are recommended to avoid long lines.

The Capitolini Museums in the piazza del Campidoglio of Rome
Capitolini Museums

They constitute a public gallery of the world’s oldest sculptures. Created by Pope Sixtus IV in 1471, they were enriched by successive popes as new statues were brought to light. The museums occupy the Palazzo Nuovo and the Palazzo dei Conservatori, both located on Piazza del Campidoglio.

Opening times: open every day 9.30-19.30, on the 24 and 31 December 9.30-14. The ticket office closes an hour earlier. Closed on January 1st, May 1st, December 31st. Full ticket € 14, reduced ticket € 12

You may also be interested

Visiting Rome in 3 days – Our recommended itinerary 
Trips outside of Rome – What to see and where to go
Panoramic hopo on hop off bus: tour with city Sightseeing of Rome
Piazza Navona and the squares of the historic centre – Walking itinerary

PARTICIPATE IN THE AUDIENCE OF POPE FRANCIS

If you have decided to visit Rome in 3 days (but not during the weekend) and you are faithful to Pope Francis, do not miss the opportunity to attend his weekly audience. It takes place on Wednesday at 10.30 am in St. Peter’s Square or in the Paul VI Audience Hall, also known as the Sala Nervi. Whenever possible, Pope Francis visits the whole square with the popemobile starting from under the Arco delle Campane, making several stops to greet and embrace the people around.

By booking the tickets with Getyourguide you can also add to the Pope Francis audience a guided tour that will introduce you to the fascinating stories of the papacy and the artists who have contributed to making the Vatican City one of the greatest beauties in the world.
For the tour, which lasts 4 hours, both a smartphone and paper vouchers are accepted and it is possible to cancel until the day before to receive a full refund.

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By booking the tour:

  • You will be asked to book and confirm the participation in the hearing
  • You will receive tickets comfortably and you will have the best seats
  • Before the beginning of the Pope’s speech you will be provided with all the necessary information and explanations related to the event
  • You will be given headphones to follow carefully all the speech by Pope Francis
  • You will take part in the papal audience accompanied by the tour staff

Notes:
The tour ends at the beginning of the hearing and the duration of the hearing may vary
It is necessary to wear appropriate clothing (knees, shoulders and back should be covered)
People in wheelchairs or those with reduced mobility must be accompanied or assisted by someone.

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THE TREVI FOUNTAIN

Immortalized by Marcello Mastroianni and Anita Ekberg in the film by Fellini “La dolce vita”, the Trevi Fountain is one of the main attractions of Rome and should be an essential stop on your itinerary in the capital. If you want to visit Rome in 3 days or if you only have one weekend, you can not leave without having seen it and thrown your coin into the water to be able to come back!

The Trevi Fountain is a very large sculptural complex, so much so that it occupies almost the entire square.
It was created by Nicola Salvi in 1732 and completed in 1762 by Giuseppe Pannini.
Made with travertine, marble, plaster, stucco and metals, it represents Ocean on a cart pulled by two horses (a wild one and another docile, that represent the different moods of the sea), which in turn are guided by tritons.

The fountain, today as when it was built, is fed by one of the oldest aqueducts in Rome, the aqueduct of Acqua Virgo (Acqua Vergine), built between 19 and 22 a.C. from Agrippa. The name Trevi derives from the fact that at this point three ways converged.

On the eastern side of the Trevi Fountain there is a large vase in stone called “ace of cups” because it recalls the playing card. It is said that during the construction works, a barber, who owned his shop on the square, continued to criticize the Salvi’s project. Salvi then added the vase so as to prevent the barber from seeing the work and continuing to make his annoying criticism.

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Since the aqueduct was completed on this site there has always been a fountain. In 1453 Pope Nicholas V commissioned Leon Battista Alberti to restore the water way.
In 1629, Urban VIII commissioned Bernini to design a new fountain, but it was never built.
In 1730 Pope Clement XII announced a competition to choose the best architectural projects. The Salvi’s project won the competition and two years later the works began.

The last restoration of the Trevi Fountain dates back to 2015. The cost of 2.2 million euros were financed by the Fendi fashion house and the work brought the fountain back to its former glory.

TRADITIONS RELATED TO THE TREVI FOUNTAIN

The most famous tradition is the tossing of a coin into the fountain: by doing this with closed eyes and turning on the opposite side of Palazzo Poli, one would favor a future return to the city.
The origins of this tradition are not well known. Perhaps it could derive from the ancient custom of throwing into the sacred sources obols or small gifts to propitiate the local divinity, as it happens for the wells of desires.

There is no tourist who does not know this tradition and who does not perform this ritual. The Municipality of Rome established in 2006 that all the reclaimed coins (a sum equal to about three thousand euros per day) should be destined for Caritas in Rome. In fact, around 3,000 euros are drawn every day from the fountain. All those who take the money for themselves are prosecuted criminally.

According to another tradition, when people still drank water from the fountain (and the water of Trevi, which today is used only for irrigation and to feed the fountains, was considered among the best in Rome, because it is not calcareous) girls asked their boyfriend who was leaving to drink it in a glass, that was later shattered in sign and wish of fidelity.

You may also be interested

Visiting Rome in 3 days – Our recommended itinerary 
Visiting Rome in 2 days with children – Where to go and what to do
The Colosseum- 10 curiosities all to discover
The Colosseum – What is it like?

VISITING ROME IN 2 DAYS WITH CHILDREN – WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO

Visiting Rome in 2 days with your children will be a piece of cake. The Italian capital city offers its young visitors a lot of activities and places to see. There are many parks, museums and events that you will be able to fit into your itinerary.
If you wish, you can follow the 2 day Rome-with-children itinerary we have designed for you! This itinerary is only a suggestion: you can adapt and modify it according to your interests and the time you would like to devote to each activity.
We advise you to use our Roma Pass for your visits. It will allow you to benefit from discounts and additional services while you visit museums and attractions in Rome.

FIRST DAY

Villa Borghese, the ideal place if you want to visit Rome with your children.

The first day of our 2 days Rome itinerary for a visit with children includes a stop at Villa Borghese. With its 80 hectares of green (roughly 200 acres), it is one of the biggest public parks in Rome, as well as one of the most famous. It is an oasis of serenity, offering several activities for families: it is possible to ride a bike through the park without having to worry about cars.

The park houses the Carlo Bilotti museum, very small but with valuable works of art. It hosts 18 works by Giorgio de Chirico and a portrait of Bilotti’s wife and daughter, performed by Andy Warhol. The admission is free and a visit does not take long so it could be a good idea to visit it, if the children are not too small. From the museum, go to Piazza di Siena, where horse racing and summer concerts are currently organized.

Near the square you will find the Casina di Raffaello, a playground for children from 3 to 10 years old. Here children can play and listen to animated readings and participate in one of the many activities organized by the toy library.

But the place that you will certainly enjoy the most is the Biopark, which hosts about 1100 animals from 200 different species and is definitely an attraction that your little ones will surely love. The biopark extends for 18 hectares and also organizes children’s didactic laboratories.

After the walk stop in the park for lunch
Refreshed and rested start your afternoon step of this itinerary to visit Rome in 2 days with children: EXPLORA, a museum dedicated to children from 0 to 12 years old.

It is set up as a child-sized miniature city, where everything can be experienced, touched, lived. The museum opens at 10am and the visit (not guided) takes about 45 minutes.

It is advisable to book on weekdays and it is surely necessary to do it on weekends.

Reserved tickets must be picked up at the ticket office 15 minutes before the check-in time, otherwise your reservation will be canceled. The museum is very engaging and your kids will love it.

The property is located at Via Flaminio at number 82. From the Bioparco you will have to take a half-hour walk.

Second Day

The Colosseum, one of the main attractions of Rome.

On the second day of our itinerary to visit Rome in 2 days with children, we propose a visit of the Colosseum (accessible to the disabled), the attraction that most of all represents the capital. It is undoubtedly the most fascinating of Rome’s monuments. It was in fact the place where the gladiators fought to their last breath and the condemned to death fought against the lions in front of an ecstatic audience.

It can be visited on two levels and most of the structure of the arena is still visible. Reserve about one hour for the visit. If you have the Roma Pass you can skip the queue and save valuable time, in addition to avoid getting the kids tired even before entering.
When you go out of the Colosseum continue the itinerary along the Via dei Fori Imperiali, at the end of which you can admire the Trajan’s Market and the beautiful Trajan Column, which describes with beautiful bas-reliefs the military campaigns of the Emperor Trajan against the population of Daci.

Get up to Piazza Venezia and climb the Vittoriano stairs.

If you do not want to be reprimanded do not sit on the steps (it is forbidden to sit down for respect to the tomb of the unknown soldier to whom the monument is dedicated and the controls are robust).

Enjoy the magnificent view by climbing up to the terrace with the elevator located to the side of the monument and then have a lunch in the area and rest.

After the break, you have two alternatives on this itinerary to visit Rome in 2 days with children: you can bring your children to the Wax Museum. It is the third largest in Europe for the number of collected characters. It contains a collection of 250 wax figures including, in addition to popes, politicians and poets, Barack Obama, Francesco Totti and, for the joy of the girls, Biancaneve.

Alternatively you can bring your kids to the Time Elevator, a 3D cinema inaugurated in 2005, where it’s worth seeing the show on three scenic screens, Time Elevator Roma, a virtual trip in a 45-minute flight simulator during almost 3,000 years of Roman history. The show start every hour.
The wonderful fountain of Trevi is among the things to see in Rome.

Continue the afternoon until you reach the fantatisc Trevi Fountain, another of Rome’s capital attractions around the world.

The sculptural complex of the fountain occupies almost the whole square. As a result of a recent restoration, the Trevi fountain today is visible in all its original splendor. Make the inevitable usual photos and then take the Via del Corso (the most important shopping street in Rome) where you will be able to shop for the whole family.

Finally come to Piazza del Popolo, where you will find a 23.9 meters obelisk. It is the first obelisk to be transported to Rome at the time of Augustus, to celebrate the Emperor’s victory over Egypt. Initially it was placed at the Circus Maximus.

Our itinerary to visit Rome for two days with children ends up here.

 

ROME IN A WEEK – THE MUSEUMS

Are you crazy about museums and have you planned to visit Rome in a week? Then the capital is the best choice for you. In fact there are many museums where you can satisfy your desire for art. From the most important and famous to the smallest and most special ones you have only to choose.
If you are a workaholic you can try to visit a museum every day. Keep in mind that the visit will take you at least two hours. If, on the other hand, this timetable seems too difficult, you can decide to dedicate a few days to the museums.
After the visit, you can spend the rest of the day by exploring the area of the city that is located around the museum that you have chosen.

CAPITOLINI MUSEUMS

They are a must if you try to visit Rome in a week, but they should be put in the itinerary even if you visit Rome in 5,4,3,2 days … in short, they should be seen!
It is the oldest museum in the world and is housed in two spectacular buildings located in Piazza del Campidoglio. The origin of the Capitoline Museums dates back to 1471, when Pope Sixtus IV donated to the citizens some bronze sculptures, laying the foundations of what is today one of the greatest Italian collections of classical art.
The centerpiece of the collection are the ancient statues, but in the Capitoline Gallery you can also find masterpieces of many Italian and Flemish artists.
The Capitoline Museums are equipped for the disabled
Stop: Piazza Venezia
Opening time: every day 9.30-19.30, 24 and 31 December 9.30-14. The ticket office closes an hour earlier. Closed on January 1st, May 1st, December 31st.

PALACE AND GALLERY DORIA PAMPHILJ

Behind the façade of Palazzo and Galleria Doria Panphilij there is one of the richest private art collections in Rome, both for the number of works and for the importance of the authors who made them.
The galleries consist of ten rooms, arranged chronologically and filled with floor-to-ceiling paintings. Do not miss the Salome with the head of the Baptist Titian and Rest on the flight to Egypt of Caravaggio and alsol the portrait of Innocent X of Velasquez.
The gallery is wheelchair accessible.
Stop: Piazza Venezia (via del Corso)
Opening time: every day from 9.00 to 19.00. Last entry at 18.00. Closed on: December 25th, January 1st, Easter. Also open on November 1st, Easter Monday, April 25th, May 1st, June 2nd and August 15th.

VATICAN MUSEUMS

With its 7 km of exhibition space, the Vatican Museums are a truly unique experience, not just for art lovers. None of those who enter this museum complex can in fact remain indifferent to what is one of the greatest collections of art in the world. Masterpieces such as the Stanze di Raffaello and the incredible Sistine Chapel are already a reason to come and visit Rome.
Founded by Julius II they are found in the halls and galleries of the Vatican Apostolic Palaces.
Almost all the sectors of the Vatican Museums are accessible to the disabled.
Stop: Ottaviano San Pietro
Opening times: Monday to Saturday 9.00-18.00 (last admission at 4pm and exit from the rooms half an hour before closing).

MUSEUM AND GALLERY BORGHESE

This is another museum that you must absolutely include in your itinerary if you want to visit Rome in a week.
Defined as the “queen of private collections of art”, this museum boasts some of the most precious treasures of the capital. It contains works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Botticelli and Raffaello, and the famous statue of Canova portraying Paolina Borghese as the winning Venus.
The gallery is accessible to people with disabilities.
Stop: via Pinciana
Opening times: Monday closed, Tuesday to Sunday from 8.30 to 19.30 closed January 1, December 25. Entry is allowed until half an hour before closing.

ROMAN NATIONAL MUSEUM: PALAZZO MASSIMO ALLE TERME

The museum is often overlooked, it is wonderful, wide and bright and contains spectacular classical art pieces (the resting boxer, sleeping Hermaphrodite), as well as extraordinary paintings and mosaics. The advice is to start the visit from the second floor so as to admire the most extraordinary works when you are still refreshed.
When you admire the frescoes you will get an idea of the interior of the sumptuous villas of ancient Rome.
The museum is completely accessible to the disabled
Stop: Termini
Opening time: Open every day from 9 to 19.45. Closed on Mondays (except Monday in Albis and during the cultural week), January 1st, December 25th. The ticket office closes at 19.00.

MAXXI

The MAXXI (National Museum of the XXI Century Arts) is the most important contemporary art museum in the capital. Designed by the Anglo-Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid, it was inaugurated in 2010. The geometric façade of the building, built on several levels, hides an interior of gigantic dimensions, full of light and crossed by suspended staircases and structures made of glass, concrete and iron. It consists of two sections, one dedicated to architecture and the other to contemporary art. It is very interesting to visit it on the occasion of exhibitions and installations.
The museum is wheelchair accessible.
Bus stop: (line A stop Flaminio) by tram, Viale Tiziano for buses.
Opening time:Tuesday to Friday from 11.00 to 19.00, Saturday from 11.00 to 20.00, Sunday from 11.00 to 19.00. Closed every Monday, December 25th and January 1st. The ticket office closes an hour earlier.

Free Museums in Rome: What to See and When to Visit Them

Knowing where are the free museums in Rome will allow you to “get an education” without putting your hand in the wallet. There are in fact several free museums in Rome: some are always free, others are free only on the first Sunday of the month, others still have free entrance on the last Sunday.

To simplify the task of understanding which museums to see and when to access them for free, we have created a list of some of the free museums in Rome: choose where to go according to your interests and the time you have available.

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Museums in Rome That Are Always Free

Napoleonic Museum

In the museum there is a large collection of Napoleonic memorials, inherited from the collection owned by Count Giuseppe Primoli (1851-1927), son of Carlotta Bonaparte and kept inside Palazzo Primoli. Inside the same palace there is the Primoli Library and the Mario Praz Museum, the detached home of the National Gallery of Modern Art.
Address: Piazza di Ponte Umberto I, 1

Timetable: Tuesday – Sunday 10.00 – 18.00; 24 and 31 December 10 am – 2 pm. The ticket office closes half an hour before. Closed on Monday, December 25, January 1, May 1.
Admission: free
www.museonapoleonico.it

Museum of the Roman Republic and Garibaldi Memory

It is located in Porta San Pancrazio, a strategic point for the defense of the French siege of 1849, conducted by Garibaldi. The museum and the Garibaldi’s memorabilia are small but well-kept, and lead through the memories of the heroic resistance in which Goffredo Mameli and Emilio Dandolo died. Among Garibaldi’s memorabilia you’ll find the red shirt worn by Garibaldi.
Address: Largo di Porta San Pancrazio

Timetable: Tuesday – Friday 10.00 – 14.00 (entry every 45 minutes); Saturday, Sunday and public holidays 10.00 – 18.00 (normal entrance); 24, 31 December 10.00-14.00. Closed December 25, January 1, May 1.
Admission: free
www.museodellarepubblicaromana.it

Museum Carlo Bilotti

It is a small museum. It contains only 23 works, of which 18 are by Giorgio De Chirico. Temporary exhibitions are often held here.
Address: Viale Fiorello La Guardia

Timetable: Tuesday – Friday 10.00 – 16.00; Saturday and Sunday 10.00 – 19.00. Closed on Mondays.
Admission: free
www.museocarlobilotti.it/

Historical Museum of Liberation

It is the palace, now converted into a museum, which was used by the SS as a place of imprisonment and torture for so many anti-fascists, many of whom were shot by the same SS. It is a collection of documents, newspapers, posters and flyers about the Nazi-fascist occupation of Rome and the Second World War Italian Resistance.

The structure has been kept as close as possible to its appearance during the war years, so it is not welcoming buiding.
Address: Via Tasso, 145

Timetable: Tuesday – Sunday 9.30 – 12.30; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays 15.30 – 19.30. Monday closed.
Admission: free
www.museoliberazione.it

Barracco Museum (Giovanni Barracco’s ancient sculpture museum)

It contains a beautiful collection of Greek, Roman, Assyrian and Egyptian sculptures and artefacts, donated to Rome by Senator Giovanni Barracco in 1902.
Address: Corso Vittorio Emanuele 166/A

Timetable: October to May: Tuesday – Sunday 10.00 – 16.00; June to September: Tuesday – Sunday 13.00 – 19.00; 24.31 December 10.00-14.00. Entrance up to half an hour before closing. Closed on Monday, December 25, January 1, May 1
Admission: free
www.museobarracco.it

You may also be interested

Visit the Rome museums in 3 days – What To see
The Colosseum – How it is made?
Visiting Rome in 3 days – Our recommended itinerary 
Visiting Rome in 2 days with children – Where to go and what to do
The Vatican Museums
Visit the Vatican City – What to visit

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Visit Rome in 3 Days with Children. Where to Go, What to Do and What to See

If you plan to visit Rome in 3 days with children you will have no problem to arrange a trip. The eternal city, actually, even if has the reputation of being a “destination for acculturated people”, has a lot to offer also to small visitors. Parks, museums, attractions, there are plenty of things to see and have fun with them.

Below we propose our itinerary to visit Rome in 3 days with children. This is a rough itinerary that you can adapt and modify according to the interests and the time that you want to devote to each attraction.

First Day

What Will you see:
Explora
Giardini di villa Borghese
Museo Carlo Billotti
Piazza di Siena

Our itinerary begins with a visit to an attraction that your kids will definitely adore: EXPLORA, a museum dedicated to children from 0 to 12 years old. It is set up as a child-sized miniature city, where everything can be experienced, touched, lived. The museum opens at 10am and the visit (unguided) takes about 45 minutes. It is advisable to book on weekdays and it is absolutely necessary to do it on weekends. The reserved tickets must be picked up at the ticket office 15 minutes before the check-in time, otherwise your reservation will be canceled. To get to the museum go down to the Flaminio Metro stop and take Via Flaminio. The property is at number 82. After the visit go back to the metro station.
The gardens of Villa Borghese are a great idea if you need to visit Rome in 3 days with children.

By going through Viale Whashington you will find yourself in the beautiful gardens of Villa Borghese. Walk in the park where children can run and play at their leisure and stop there to eat.

After lunch, dedicate a stage for you adults at the Carlo Bilotti Museum. It is small and has only 23 pieces, of which 18 works by Giorgio de Chirico, including the famous sculpture “Hector and Andromaca”, located at the entrance. The free view will not take long. It will be interesting for you, and your children, unless they are too small, will appreciate it.

Continue the itinerary following the same road until you arrive at Piazza di Siena, where currently horse racing and summer concerts are organized. Near the square there is the Casina di Raffaello, a playhouse located in a beautiful palace of the 500, which offers fun shows and workshops for children from 3 to 10 years. Finally, you will arrive at the last stop of the day on this trip to visit Rome in three days with children: the Bioparco, which hosts about 1100 animals of 200 different species, it is an attraction to which your little ones will not say No.

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Second Day

The second day of our itinerary to visit Rome in 3 days with children begins with the Colosseum (accessible to the disabled), the attraction that most of all represents the capital. Opened in the 80 AD by the Emperor Tito, has always had a function of celebrating public events, performances, fights of gladiators, and so on. It was and still is a show by itself. It can be visited on two levels and most of the structure of the arena is still visible. Reserve about an hour for the visit. If you have the Roma Pass you can jump the queue.
Continue the itinerary along the Via dei Fori Imperiali, at the end of which you can admire the Trajan’s Market and the beautiful Trajan Column. Stop there and spend some time looking at the bas-reliefs that, like in a film, describe the emperor’s military campaigns against the Daci population. Via dei Fori Imperiali ends with the Vittoriano that may be a great destination if you are planning to visit Rome in 3 days with children.

Piazza Venezia. Go up the steps of the Vittoriano (remember that it is forbidden to sit down for respect of the tomb of the unknown soldier to whom the monument is dedicated and that the controls are strict), take the usual pictures, and if you want to enjoy a nice view of the city, go up the terrace with the elevator located to the side of the monument.

Stay in the area for lunch. After having lunch and taking some rest, reach Piazza Santi Apostoli. You can bring your children to visit the Wax Museum, the third largest in Europe for the number of characters that have been collected. It contains a collection of 250 wax figures including, in addition to popes, politicians and poets such as Barack Obama, Francesco Totti and, for the joy of the girls, Biancaneve.
Alternatively, for a “more cultural” visit, you can go to Time Elevator, a 3D cinema inaugurated in 2005, where it is worth seeing the show on three scenic screens of Time Elevator Roma, a virtual trip in a lifetime simulator 45 minutes long through almost 3000 years of Roman history. The show starts every hour.

Going out of the cinema you can reach the Trevi Fountain, another of the attractions of Rome absolutely not to be missed. Take a moment here and make some pictures in front of this symbol of the capital. Then take the Via del Corso (shopping street) where you can shop for the whole family.

Finally come to Piazza del Popolo, where you will find a 23.9 meters obelisk. It is the first obelisk that was transported to Rome at the time of Augustus, to celebrate the Emperor’s victory over Egypt. Initially it was positioned at the Circus Maximus.

Third Day

Our advice for the thitd day of your itinerary to visit Rome in 3 days with children is to go and visit the Vatican City. Take the subway and get off at Ottaviano-San Pietro stop. From there go through via Via Ottaviano and reach Piazza San Pietro, one of the largest public spaces in the world.
Visit Rome in 3 days with children: St. Peter’s Basilica

Take some photos and let yourself be impressed by the vastness and magnificence of the place. Then visit St. Peter’s Basilica (pay attention to the clothes you wear, because shorts, skirts and bare shoulders are not allowed) and allow yourself to be astonished by the enormity and richness of its interior. Stop to admire the moving Pietà of Michelangelo, which is protected behind a bulletproof glass. The artist sculpted it at the age of only 25 and it is the only work to bring his signature (you’ll find it engraved on the band that surrounds Maria’s chest).
When you leave the basilica, take Via della Conciliazione until you reach Castel Sant’Angelo and visit it inside. If you have the Roma Pass you can skip the queue by going to the special turnstiles for direct access to the site. We recommend that you do not leave without going through the Terrace of the Angel, from where you can enjoy a wonderful view of the city.

When you finish your visit stop for lunch. Be aware that in the area around the Vatican there are many trattorias and pizzerias that have no problem with serving poor food at prices far from cheap.

The fountain of the four rivers of Piazza Navona

After having some lunch and resumed some strenght reach Piazza Navona with its beautiful baroque palaces and the wonderful fountains (including the one of the four rivers by Bernini) .The square is characterized by a crowd of tourists, street artists and portrayers invading it every hour of the day and night.
From here keep going along Via del Governo Vecchio until you arrive in Campo dei Fiori with the famous statue of Giordano Bruno, a heretic monk condemned to the stake during the counterreformation period, in the shadow of which the famous market full of colorful stalls is held. The square is one of the main points of the Roman life, during the day with its market, in the evening as a place to drink something. If children are hungry, there is a bakery called the”Ancient Oven” in front of the Giordano Bruno’s statue, which offers white pizza and very good focaccia breads.

Our itinerary to visit Rome in 3 days with children ends up here. If you want you can end the day by dining nearby.

Opening times

Explora:
January to July, September to December
1st Round 10:00 – 11:45;
2nd Round 12:00 – 13:45;
3° Round 15:00 – 16:45;
4th Round 17:00 – 18:45.

August
1st Round 12:00 – 13:45;
2nd Round 15:00 – 16:45,
3rd Round 17:00 – 18:45. 24 and 31

December
1st Round 10:00 – 11:45;
2nd Round 12:00 – 13:45,
3rd Round 15:00 – 16:45.

12-36 MONTHS € 5,00
from 3 years € 8,00
adult 8,00
Thursday afternoon (excluding holidays) € 6,00.

Museo Carlo Bilotti:
October – May
from Tuesday to Friday 10.00 – 16.00 (entrance allowed until 15.30);
Saturday and Sunday 1 10.00 – 19.00 (entrance allowed until 18.30)
24 and 31 December 10.00-14.00.
Closed Monday, December 25, January 1, May 1. Free entry.

June – September
from Tuesday to Friday from 13.00 to 19.00 (entrance until 18.30),
Saturday and Sunday 10.00 – 19.00 (entrance allowed until 18.30).

Casina di Raffaello:
January
11 to February 29 from Tuesday to Friday 9.30-15.30
Saturday, Sunday and public holidays 10.00-18.00;
from March 1st to June 30th from Tuesday to Friday 9.00-18.00,
Saturday, Sunday and public holidays 10.00-19.00.
Monday closed. € 7,00 for ALL children, free of charge for disabled and accompanying, € 5.00 reduced

St. Peter’s Basilica:
1st October – 31st March every day 7.00-18.30
1 April – 30 September every day 7-19.00.
Free admission

Castel Sant’Angelo:
daily 9.00-19.30 (ticket office closes at 18.30).
Full € 10, reduced € 5.

Colosseum:
every day except December 25 and January 1 9-17.
Until 15 February 8.30 – 16.30;
February 16th to March 15th 8.3 – 17.00;
from 16 to the last Saturday of March 8.30 – 17.30;
from the last Sunday of March to 31 August 8.30 – 19.15;
from 1 to 30 September 08.30 – 19.00;
from the first to the last Saturday of October 8.30 – 18.30.
Last entry one hour before closing.
Full € 12, reduced € 7.50, free under 18 years.
Included in the Roma Pass

The Rome Districts Where One Can Find A Good Hotel

Where would you be able to find a good hotel in Rome? Below we propose an overview of the different areas of Rome so that you can choose the one that is the most convenient to you according to your needs and your budget.

Ancient Rome

Here there are the remains of the glorious past of the capital, such as the Colosseum, the Palatine, the Imperial Forum and the Campidoglio. Crowded during the day by day-to-day tourists, after the closure of the monuments it becomes very quiet throughout the night. Here there are are high-end hotels and you will not be able to find many cheap options.

Old Town

With its cobbled alleys, lively squares, Renaissance palaces, beautifull cafes and trendy restaurants, this is the most fascinating area of Rome. Piazza Navona and the Pantheon are not far away, and there are many monuments, museums and churches full of art treasures. It is the capital’s most expensive neighborhood and therefore it will not be that simple to find cheap hotels. Please note also that it might be noisy.

Tridente, Trevi And The Quirinale

This area, crowded with tourists, is full of glamorous, trendy boutiques and refined hotels. It is an excellent solution if you are looking for mid-range hotels. The neighborhood has a good transport network.

Vatican City, Borgo And Prati

The neighborhood is close to the Basilica of Saint Peteir and the Vatican Museums. Here there are hundreds of souvenir shops and restaurants that are often too expensive for what they offer. In the wealthy area of Prati there is a good choice of hotels, shops and restaurants. It is well connected to the subway.

From San Giovanni to Testaccio

It is an area of many facets. Here you can find medieval churches and monumental basilicas such as San Giovanni in Laterano, imposing ruins such as the Baths of Caracalla or quiet villas such as Villa Celimontana. If you love nightlife, you can find the best in Testaccio, with its traditional taverns. Here you can find cheaper hotels than in the center. If you are looking for a quiet and romantic place, choose the Aventino.

South Rome (Roma Sud)

It is a large area that extends to the southern limits of the town. The most interesting areas are the ancient Appia road, Via Ostiense and the EUR. It offers many ways to have fun, with trendy places and trendy bars. Here there is also the Quartiere della Garbatella, very quiet and without noise, with low houses, vegetable gardens and gardens. It is the neighborhood where the successful fiction “I Cesaroni” has been set. The metro is quite close (line B stop Garbatella)

Villa Borghese and North Rome

It is one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Rome. Here there is the most famous park in Rome (Villa Borgese) and the most exclusive residential area (Parioli). Those who love music can not go to the Auditorium park of music. Those who love art can choose between the MAXXI and the Borghese Museum and Gallery. Typically in the evening the area is quiet. There are not many cheap hotels.

Monti, Esquilino and San Lorenzo

This is the area that gravitates around Termini station, so its streets are noisy. It has one of the most beautiful museums in Rome, that is the Palazzo Massimo alle terme. If you are looking for a budget hotel in Rome, this neighborhood is for you.

Trastevere and Gianicolo

This beautiful area of Rome, with its postcard lanes and its nonconformist atmosphere, is one of the most beloved neighborhoods in Rome. There is always a celebration air and there are hundreds of bars, cafes, restaurants and trattorias. For this reason it can be very noisy. Hotel accommodations are expensive.

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Visit the Churches of Rome in 3 Days. The Suggested Itinerary

If you are passionate about Christian art, this itinerary to visit the churches of Rome in 3 days is for you. It will take you on a journey through the most beautiful and most interesting churches from the historical, artistic and faith point of view.

All itineraries can be walked all on footso wear comfortable shoes!!!

First Day

The Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri in Rome

 Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri

The itinerary, which will last a full day, takes place in the historic center of the city. You can start from Piazzale della Repubblica (metro station: Repubblica) in front of which stands the huge Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri (St. Mary of Angels and Martyrs) that incorporates those that once were the great antechamber and the tepidarium of Diocletian Baths, of which eight huge Egyptian marble columns remain.

Designed by Michelangelo, it was completely remodeled by Vanvitelli in 1750. Notice the double sundial traced on the transept floor, which indicates the polar star and when the sun rises to the Zenit.
From the square get on via Nazionale and reach the Church of San Paolo in the walls. In gothic style, it is the first non Roman Catholic church. The American episcopal church, completed in 1880, is famous for the nineteenth-century mosaics made by Edward Burne-James, who included among the characters of the work some portraits of his contemporaries.
Santa Prudenziana, step of the itinerary to visit the churches of Rome in 3 days

The trip to visit the churches of Rome in 3 days continues with the Church of Santa Prudenziana, the church of the Philippine community of Rome. Noteworthy is the golden mosaic of the 4th century which represents the oldest apsidal mosaic of the city. Continue past Piazza Esquilino until you arrive at the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore, one of the four papal basilics dating from the 5th century. Among the things to see there are the 13th-century mosaics of the façade, the cosmatic floorings, similar to marble carpets and mosaics of the apse.
From here keep going and you will find the Church of Santa Prassede, characterized by its glittering Byzantine mosaics, whose tiles still shine after a millennium from its creation. Then take via Merulana and go down to the bottom where the Basilica of Sant’Antonio in Laterano stands, with its artistic masterpieces and frescoes attributed to Franciscan artists. Next to this building you will find the Basilica of San Giovanni in Laterano, the oldest among the papal basilicas. Consecrated in 324 it was a papal seat until 1309, then fell into ruins. What you see today is the result of remakes made after 1361. You can admire the monument to Pope Silvestro, the canopy and the cloister.

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Second Day

We propose to spend the second day of our itinerary to visit the churches of Rome in 3 days in the Vatican City. We recommend that you start your visit early in the morning when the influx of tourists is not yet “crazy.”

Visit The St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome
St. Peter’s Basilica

The basilica is the largest and richest church in Italy. The first thing that will surprise you is the large size of the church and of everything inside it (including the holy water containers!). Among the things to admire there are the Bernini canopy on the papal altar and the immense dome. Take some time to admire the moving Michelangelo’s Pieta, which is behind a bulletproof glass in a chapel at the beginning of the right nave. Sculpted by the artist when he was 25, it is the only work that comes with his signature (on the band that surrounds Maria’s chest).
The itinerary continues with a visit to the Vatican Grottos, which stretch under the basilica for its entire length. Here you’ll find the tombs of many popes, including that of Pope John Paul II, which will surprise you for its simplicity in comparison to the glittering of the monuments of the basilica above. You can also see some large columns belonging to the basilica of the fourth century.

The last stop that we propose is the Vatican Museums, an attraction not to be missed. Buy the tickets online to avoid the queue at the entrance. The museum complex contains one of the largest art collections in the world. It has been calculated that it would takeSpend at least 12 years to visit it all! Spend there at least a couple of plentiful hours, without missing the Pinacoteca, the Pio-Clementino Museum, the Geographic Charters Gallery, the Raffaello Rooms and of course the unmissable Sistine Chapel

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Third Day

We recommend that you dedicate the last day of the itinerary to visit the churches of Rome in 3 days to a visit of the Aventino hill, where some of the oldest churches in Rome can be found.

Visiting Rome: Bocca della Verita, The Mouth of Truth

The Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth)

The itinerary starts from the Circo Massimo (metro stop: Circo Massimo). Today it looks more or less a working grass basin, but in the I century. B.C. was the largest stadium in Rome, with a capacity of up to 250,000 spectators. From there proceed to the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth). Take some photos that can witness that you’ve been here and then head to the Aventine, which hosts the Roseto Comunale (Town Rose Garden) with more than 1100 roses from around the world. Continue the itinerary by taking Via Santa Sabina and visit the Giardino degli aranci (Oranges Garden), from which you can see one of the most beautiful views of Rome. Take advantage of it to make some panoramic photos. Return to the street where you will meet the Basilica of Santa Sabina, dated to the 5th century, period when the cypress wood portal with 18 carved panels were made up. One of them is the crucifixion, one of the first portrayal of Christ’s passion. The church of Santa Maria del Priorato is located next to Piazza Cavalieri of Malta, the order to which the church belongs.
Keep going straight to the Cimitero Acattolico (Non Catholic Cemetery), considered one of the most beautiful non-Catholic cemeteries in the world. In front of the cemetery there is the Pyramid of Caio Cestio inspired by the Egyptian style and built in I sec. B.C.

Rome's actractions: Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls
Visit the churches of Rome in 3 days. Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls

The tour to visit the churches of Rome in three days ends with a visit to the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls. Built by Constantine in the 4th century on the tomb of Saint Paul (decapitated under Nero in 67 AD), the splendid basilica was the largest church in the world until the construction of today’s St. Peter’s Basilica. what we see today is a faithful reconstruction after the fire of 1823, although some original parts remained, such as the triumphal arch, the Gothic ciborium and the candelabrum for the Easter votive candle.
In the itinerary that we have proposed to visit the churches of Rome in 3 days, we did not suggest any times for pauses and we entrust them to you depending on your interest and on the time that you would like to dedicate to individual attractions.

Practical Information

Basilica Santa Maria of Angels and Martyrs: 7am-6.30pm free admission

Saint Paul’s Church inside the walls: 9am-1.30pm free entrance

Church of Santa Prudenziana: 8am-12am / 4pm-6pm free admission

Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore: 7am-8pm free admission

Church of Santa Prassede: 7am-12am/4pm-6pm Free admission

Basilica of St. Anthony in Laterano: 7am-6.30pm free entrance

Saint John in Lateran Basilica: 7am-6.30pm free entrance

St. Peter’s Basilica: 1st October – 31st March every day 7am-6.30pm / 1 April – 30 September every day 7am-7pm. Free admission.

Vatican Museums: Monday to Saturday 9am-6pm (last entry at 4pm and exit from theaters half an hour before closing).

Vatican Grottos: 7am-6pm free entrance

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