Uncategorized

The Rome Districts Where One Can Find A Good Hotel

Where would you be able to find a good hotel in Rome? Below we propose an overview of the different areas of Rome so that you can choose the one that is the most convenient to you according to your needs and your budget.

Ancient Rome

Here there are the remains of the glorious past of the capital, such as the Colosseum, the Palatine, the Imperial Forum and the Campidoglio. Crowded during the day by day-to-day tourists, after the closure of the monuments it becomes very quiet throughout the night. Here there are are high-end hotels and you will not be able to find many cheap options.

Old Town

With its cobbled alleys, lively squares, Renaissance palaces, cafes and trendy restaurants, this is the most fascinating area of Rome. Piazza Navona and the Pantheon are not far away, and there are many monuments, museums and churches full of art treasures. It is the capital’s most expensive neighborhood and therefore it will not be that simple to find cheap hotels. Please note also that it might be noisy.

Tridente, Trevi And The Quirinale

This area, crowded with tourists, is full of glamorous, trendy boutiques and refined hotels. It is an excellent solution if you are looking for mid-range hotels. The neighborhood has a good transport network.

Vatican City, Borgo And Prati

The neighborhood is close to the Basilica of Saint Peteir and the Vatican Museums. Here there are hundreds of souvenir shops and restaurants that are often too expensive for what they offer. In the wealthy area of Prati there is a good choice of hotels, shops and restaurants. It is well connected to the subway.

From San Giovanni to Testaccio

It is an area of many facets. Here you can find medieval churches and monumental basilicas such as San Giovanni in Laterano, imposing ruins such as the Baths of Caracalla or quiet villas such as Villa Celimontana. If you love nightlife, you can find the best in Testaccio, with its traditional taverns. Here you can find cheaper hotels than in the center. If you are looking for a quiet and romantic place, choose the Aventino.

South Rome (Roma Sud)

It is a large area that extends to the southern limits of the town. The most interesting areas are the ancient Appia road, Via Ostiense and the EUR. It offers many ways to have fun, with trendy places and trendy bars. Here there is also the Quartiere della Garbatella, very quiet and without noise, with low houses, vegetable gardens and gardens. It is the neighborhood where the successful fiction “I Cesaroni” has been set. The metro is quite close (line B stop Garbatella)

Villa Borghese and North Rome

It is one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Rome. Here there is the most famous park in Rome (Villa Borgese) and the most exclusive residential area (Parioli). Those who love music can not go to the Auditorium park of music. Those who love art can choose between the MAXXI and the Borghese Museum and Gallery. Typically in the evening the area is quiet. There are not many cheap hotels.

Monti, Esquilino and San Lorenzo

This is the area that gravitates around Termini station, so its streets are noisy. It has one of the most beautiful museums in Rome, that is the Palazzo Massimo alle terme. If you are looking for a budget hotel in Rome, this neighborhood is for you.

Trastevere and Gianicolo

This beautiful area of Rome, with its postcard lanes and its nonconformist atmosphere, is one of the most beloved neighborhoods in Rome. There is always a celebration air and there are hundreds of bars, cafes, restaurants and trattorias. For this reason it can be very noisy. Hotel accommodations are expensive.

The Colosseum – 10 Curiosities All To Discover

“As long as there is Colosseum, there will also be Rome; When the Colosseum falls, Rome will also fall; When Rome falls, the world will fall as well”

(Prophecy of the Venerable Beda, eigth century).

A symbol of the greatness and power of Rome, the Flavian Amphitheater, is the most famous and impressive monument of ancient Rome and an attraction that still attracts, after two thousand years, about 5 million visitors a year.

So, whether you plan a short visit, or decide to visit Rome in 3 days or more, a stop at the Colosseum is a must.
Buy the Colosseum priority ticket here!
To let you have some knowledge when visiting this wonder, we reveal some curiosities that you may not have known before. Here they are:

When it was built

The amphitheater was built by the Emperor Vespasian on the grounds of the vast complex of the Domus Aurea of Nero. The work started in 72 a.d. and ended in 80 a.d. under the Emperor Tito. The inauguration ceremony lasted 100 days, during which 5,000 animals were killed.

The size

The shape of the Colosseum is not round but oval. It is an enormous ellipse with a 527 meter perimeter. Originally it was 52 meters tall but today its height is about 48 meters. These dimensions make it the largest amphitheater in the world. At the top there were 240 uprights supporting the “velario”, a huge fabric tapestry that covered the arena. The viewers came from 80 arched entrances (vomitoria) and could fill the Colosseum in minutes

The capacity

The Flavian amphitheater could accommodate 50,000 spectators

The origin of the name

The Colosseum was originally called the Flavian Amphitheater, in honor of the illustrious Flavi family to which belonged the emperors Vespasian, Tito and Domiziano, who started and completed the construction work.The name Colosseum dates back to the Middle Ages and refers not to its size, but to the size of the Colossus of Nero, a giant statue that was at its side.

Another hypothesis is that the name derives from its position, because it is located on a hill where once there was a temple of Isis (from which “Collis Isei”).

Usages

In addition to the fights of gladiators, the Colosseum was also used as a pool for naumachie, that is, representations of naval battles. A civil and environmental engineering professor of the University of Edinburgh, Martin Crapper, suggested that water ran through a series of internal wells and pipes under the stands and calculated that the time needed to fill the entire arena would have been of about 7 hours.

The shows

At the Colosseum the shows lasted for an entire day. The spectators were forced to bring from home soft cushions to be able to sit on the hard stone seats.

Seats

All the people could take part in the games that took place in the Colosseum. Class distinctions were made only for the assignement of seats. The cavea was in fact divided into three parts: the senators sat in the lower rows, the less wealthy in the middle rows and the plebeians in the higher rows. The women (except the vestals) were relegated to the top. For the most well-off classes the seats were in marble, while for the other people the seats were in wood. Like today, everyone had a numbered ticket and each spectator had a place assigned to a specific seat.

The podium, a large terrace in front of the rows of seats, was reserved for the emperor and senators and other personalities of concern.

As a garden

After its decline after the end of the empire, the Colosseum was covered with plants, some were exotic, and grew up with the help of the microclimate of the amphitheater. There would be about 350 species of plants that for centuries have been studied by botany experts.

The Colosseum as a quarry

During the Renaissance it was used as a travertine and marble quarry for the construction of many buildings including Palazzo Venezia and Palazzo Barberini. People stopped taking materials from the Flavian Amphitheater only in the 18th century after a renewed love for the ancient Roman vestiges. It has been calculated that only one third of the original construction has been left.

Among the seven new wonders of the world

Since 2007, the Colosseum has been included among the seven new wonders of the world along with the Great Wall of China, the ancient city of Petra in Jordan, the statue of Christ the Redeemer in Rio in Brazil, the ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru, the Chichen Itza pyramids in Mexico and the Taj Mahal in India.
If you are interested to know more about the main symbol of Rome, see the page How is the Colosseum done?

Piazza Navona and the squares of the historic center – walking itinerary

Piazza Navona is one of the many wonderful squares in Rome’s historic center. Each square has its own singular style, and none should be missed. In order to visit them all, we created a walking itinerary you can include in your Rome holiday program, especially if your plan is to stay in Rome for 3 days.
The itinerary starts from Piazza Colonna, dominated by the 30-meter column of Marcus Aurelius. This is the heart of Italian politics, featuring the sixteenth-century Palazzo Chigi, which has been the official residence of the President of the Council of Ministers since 1961.
Right next to it is Piazza Montecitorio. Here you will find the seat of the House of Deputies, active since 1871. Before the Unification of Italy, the seventeenth-century palace housed the Pontifical Curia and the Ecclesiastical Tribunal. The obelisk in the center of the square was brought from Heliopolis in Egypt by Augustus to celebrate his victory over Cleopatra and Mark Antony in 30 B.C.
From Piazza Colonna, follow Via dei Bergamaschi to reach Piazza di Pietra, a charming square with the remains of the Tempio di Adriano, dating back to the 2nd century A.D.


Piazza della Rotonda in Rome, right outside the Pantheon

Walk through Via de’ Burro, past the majestic columns of the temple, and up to Piazza Sant’Ignazio and its eponymous church. Then, take Via del Seminario up to Piazza della Rotonda, a crowded square dominated by the amazing Pantheon, one of the most iconic buildings of Western architecture. After admiring the Pantheon, walk along Via Salita dei Crescenzi, turn left unto Via di Sant’Eustachio, and reach Piazza Sant’Eustachio. Have a break at Caffè Eustachio and enjoy their espresso, considered the best in Rome. Continue through Via degli Staderari until you reach Corso del Rinascimento, then turn left, then immediately turn right.

You will finally arrive in the beautiful Piazza Navona, an exhibition of Rome’s historic center, featuring sculpted fountains, gorgeous baroque palaces and outdoor cafes. The square is always crowded with tourists, street performers and vendors. Piazza Navona has been the Rome’s main market place for 300 years. The works of two great Baroque artists can be compared here: Bernini’s Fontana Dei Quattro Fiumi and the Church of Sant’Agnes in Agone of Borromini.

After leaving the square, follow Via del Governo Vecchio, a street filled with boutiques, second-hand shops and trattorias. At the end of it turn left unto Via dei Filippini. Then continue up to Corso Vittorio Emanuele, a road that splits the historic center in two parts.

Cross it, follow Via dei Cartari up to Via del Pellegrino and you will reach Campo dei Fiori. This loud and colorful square is one of the hearts of Roman life. In the daytime it hosts one of the most famous markets of the city. In the evening it turns into an outdoor bar.
The philosopher Giordano Bruno died here as heretic on the stake in 1600.

End the itinerary in Piazza Farnese, a square in the historic center right outside of the eponymous Renaissance-style Palace.

THE ITINERARY ALONG THE FILMING LOCATIONS OF “I CESARONI”

If you are a fan of the Italian TV series “I Cesaroni,” be sure to add the filming locations of this famous comedy series to your itinerary for visiting Rome.
The outside scenes are mostly set in the popular neighborhood of Garbatella, one of the most beautiful districts of Rome. Built in the twenty-year fascist period, it was conceived as the ideal district, a garden city of social houses. In fact, there are no large buildings in this area, only small villas and colorful houses immersed in an oasis of peace. You can reach it easily through Metro line B, by getting off at the Garbatella stop.
Aside from those scenes filmed in the Garbatella district, other scenes were filmed at the Pigneto, the Prenestino, San Saba, and other areas of Rome.
Here is a list of locations that will guide you along the footsteps of “I Cesaroni”

THE SCHOOL ATTENDED BY ALICE AND RUDI

The Ugo Foscolo high school is actually the Cesare Battisti primary school, built during Mussolini’s reign in the 1930s. You can find it in Piazza Damiano Sauli. 1

THE BAR OF THE CESARONI

The wine shop, the bar of the Cesaroni, managed by the friendly Claudio Amendola, is located in Piazza Giovanni da Triora, 6, at the entrance of Roma Club Garbatella, one of the most famous bars of Rome.
This has become a tourist destination both for fans of the most-viewed Italian TV series and for people who come to visit it out of pure curiosity.
Next to the bar of the Cesaroni there is a beautiful stairway, which is actually located in Via Giovanni da Montecorvino. In the TV series, the stairway leads to the house of the Cesaroni (however, the inside is filmed in Cinecittà).

THE BAR WHERE THE GUYS MEET

You can find the bar in Piazza Sant’Eurosia, one of Garbatella’s iconic areas.

THE HOUSE OF THE CESARONI

The house is actually located in the Prenestino district, in Via di Villa Serventi, between Via Casilina and Via Straboni, the street with the garage of Max Tortora interpreted by Ezio Masett.

THE FOOTBALL FIELD

The football field is in Via Gordiani, 191, in the Prenesto district. This is actually the training field of Cisco Collatinus.

THE BOSTONIAN

The “Mo’mo’ Republic” is the beautiful bar where Alex works. A trendy spot in Rome, it’s located in Piazza Carlo Forlanini, 10, behind the hospital of the same name in the Portuense district.